Clan DNA – Introduction

An introduction, by Jane OLaughlin, Minnesota, USA

I would like to begin an ongoing discussion about Ó Lochlainn genealogy and DNA. I am an experienced genealogist, but an amateur with DNA testing.

I did my grad school minor in Plant Breeding and Genetics, so I have some genetics knowledge, although the last 30 years since then, that field has changed quite a lot. There is a bit of a learning curve with this DNA story.

WHY DNA? – Some Background

A genealogy friend by the name of Mahony had her family DNA testing done years ago for the O’Mahony clan DNA project. The clan organization had enough O’Mahony descendants tested, they were able to identify distinct geographic areas for different O’Mahony lines.

I thought it would be nice to have similar information for the Ó Lochlainn lines but the early tests were very expensive and there wasn’t an Ó Lochlainn group. That has changed now as the genome sequencing technology has gradually improved and also cheaper and there is competition, so the basic test costs are dropping below $100.00; $59.00 was available for recent holiday sales. Now is a good time for DNA.

National DNA Day was Celebrated on April 25 2017: A unique day when students, teachers and the public can learn more about genetics and genomics! National DNA Day commemorates the completion of the Human-Genome project in April 2003, and the discovery of DNA’s double-helix in 1953.

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From Choctaws to the world

While there may be no direct link to our Clan, some clan members may have benefited from an unusual act of kindness during the 19th century.

A donation from the Choctaw Nation of Native Americans to alleviate the hardship of Irish people during the famine has been marked with the dedication of a commemorative sculpture in Cork. A delegation from the Choctaw tribe, including their chief, were among those in Midleton, County Cork for the ceremony this month, June 2017.

At the height of the famine in Ireland in 1847, the Choctaw Nation of Native Americans gathered what they could and sent it across the Atlantic to alleviate the suffering of the Irish nation. That generosity was marked with the dedication of a striking piece of sculpture, entitled Kindred Spirits.

The sculpture shows nine stainless steel eagle feathers reaching seven metres towards the sky, to represent a bowl of food for the hungry.

Kindred Spirits was commissioned in 2013 by the then Midleton Town Council, to honour not just a gesture to the starving Irish but to humanity as a whole. Kindred Spirits marks the generosity of the Choctaw Nation’s donation 170 years ago. Drawing on our past, it aims to encourage future generations to practice similar acts of kindness.

Thanks to Edward O’Loghlen for this contribution

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The magic of the Burren

‘Burren orchids – Galway Bay – Connemara/Galway Coastline in the distance’. G D’Arcy

First captivated by the Burren in the early 1970s, Gordon D’Arcy has spent over thirty years living on its edge and exploring its remarkable natural heritage and rich human history.

Now he celebrates the flora, the fauna, the people and the places of the region with stories from his diaries and original watercolours that convey a deep affection and intimacy. Join Gordon in rambling the length and breadth of this renowned place, through its moods and seasons, befriending its diverse inhabitants, and breathing the Atlantic air that whispers its welcome to all comers.

Gordon D’Arcy’s work was published by Collins press, Cork in 2016.

Read more about The Burren in our brief outline page here>; and links therein to several articles in attached pages.

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A Sports Bag for Cricket and Golf!

This image transports us to Lahinch, County Clare. The owner of this Donogh O’Loghlin bag, participated at the recent Cricket competition held at Apollo Bay, Victoria, Australia during February 2017.

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Donogh OLoghlin’s shop known as Sue’s Place is situated on main street, Lahinch where many international golfers convene, before challenging their skills at the local Links-course, and they also compete with periodic storms, arriving from the adjacent Atlantic seaboard.

 

Rodney’s sports-bag has helped to twin Lahinch Links-course and the experienced Cricket players who convened at Apollo Bay, for their annual Cricket gathering.

 

Photo: courtesy of Rodney Hiscox, itinerant amateur golfer, Melbourne, Australia.

Image supplied by Michael O’Loghlen, Apollo Bay

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Season’s greetings

Cliffs of Moher in mistYour regional editors wish readers a very happy and blessed Christmas holiday and New Year 2017.

Times are sometimes uncertain and turbulent, like the wild Atlantic weather sweeping over the Cliffs of Moher and the outcrops of the Burren. Politics, trade, terrorism, isolationism, conflict — and so it goes on.

But we have much for which we can be thankful, including family, friends and our rich and noble shared heritage. If you have had a challenging year, take comfort in the joy of Christmas. Just as Clan members looked, and sometimes moved, across the seas during the tough times of the 1840s, be assured there is always promise and hope in the year to come.

May the road rise to meet you …

Image: Wikimedia.org

If there have not been enough posts on this blog for your liking, it is because you, dear Clan members, have not put pen to paper. We are not trying to be like Facebook, full of personal (dare we suggest trivial?) daily updates: we welcome good stories, historical snippets or family tales of general interest. Send a paragraph or two, preferably with a photo, to your regional editor, listed on the Home page >>

If you don’t know how to mail them, use the contact page to ask. As a last resort, send your contribution direct to the Administrator at clanolochlainn[at]gmail.com.

Merry Christmas to all,

Brendan, Edward and Regional Editors

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The woman of Ballybur

ballybur-castle-1-patrick-comerford-2016

Ballybur Castle, Kilkenny. Image: Patrick Comerford

From Patrick Comerford:

“For generations, Ballybur Castle near Cuffesgrange, was the principal seat of the Comerford family in Co Kilkenny. This castle, which stands to the east of the road between Kilkenny City and Callan, was lost by my branch of the Comerford family during the Cromwellian confiscations in the 17th century, and despite many efforts was never recovered by the family.

Ballybur Castle passed to the Mansergh family, and later passed through the hands of other families, including the St George, Delhunty, Deignan and Murphy families, and it was bought from the Marnell family in 1970s by Frank and Aifric Grey. The Grey family have restored the castle with careful attention to detail, and I have been welcomed there on countless visits in recent years.

Today Ballybur Castle is also a popular venue for wedding receptions. But recently I came across the story of a wedding connected with Ballybur Castle and the story of a young woman from Ballybur Castle who became a countess and the wife of a wealthy gold-mining magnate and philanthropist in Australia, Count Thomas James O’Loughlin (1866-1929) … “

For more information, please read on (leave this site). See also our entries on Count Thomas in this post and the People pages.ballybur-wedding

Thanks to Patrick, and to our Irish Editor and Energiser Edward.

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New Clan Author

The Other Clare group are about to launch Vol. 40 (2016) of their publication.This historical journal celebrates 40 years, at their Shannon-town launch on 25th May 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This volume contains an article by Maura OLoughlin which looks at fishing-tales from Fisherstreet, Doolin as well as those from Liscannor, County Clare through the centuries. Fishing at Liscannor, involved use of the traditional boat known as the currach with the local fishing-traditions passing from father to son, and names such as ODonnell and Scales, prominent among those fishing-folk at Liscannor.

John OBrien (The Other Clare) has selected the covers of all 40 volumes of the journal, and has included these covers on the 40th volume cover. Liscannor is located west of Lahinch/Ennistymon and some five miles south of The Cliffs of Moher.

The inventor of the submarine, John Philip Holland (1841-1914) was born at Liscannor, before leaving for the USA in 1873, where he developed his submarine designs. Later the US navy became interested and they constructed The Holland, based on Holland’s original designs.

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Happy St Patrick’s Day

IMG_1739Your editorial team wish all readers a delightful and happy St Patrick’s Day.

There will be the wearing of the green in every corner of the world where an Irish heritage, culture or connection is savoured and celebrated — I guess that’s every corner of the world!

We are indebted to our North American editor for this quite delightful photograph of a young Clan member getting into the garb and the spirit.

Madeline is daughter to Erin and Ben Bares, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. Ben wrote, back in February 2016:

This weekend we look forward to Madeline’s debut with the Trinity Irish Dance Company. She and her beginner classmates will open the show for the professional dance troop, which will hopefully be a thrill for her. Erin and I on the other hand, need to perfect our skills getting her into the ‘Irish’ dance-costume!

Edward writes:

Wishing all an enjoyable celebration on Patrick’s Day from Galway. Daffodils are out blooming over here, and we have had some fine days this week, to look after all those marchers, from Dublin to New York and Sydney.

So we wish Madeline, the young and the old, the dressers and the dancers, descendants and Clan adherents around the world a great day.

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Paintings and parliaments

Two Clan members have made the news recently.

Our Canadian Editor, Katherine Lochnan

Vincent van Gogh’s The Starry Night over the Rhone at Arles, 1888; access via thestar.com

major exhibition organised by the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) and the Musée d’Orsay breaks new art historical ground by exploring the mystical experience in nature

Mystical Landscapes: Masterpieces from Monet, van Gogh and more breaks new ground by exploring the mystical experiences of 36 artists from 15 countries.

Mystical Landscapes was conceived and developed by Dr. Katharine Lochnan, the AGO’s senior curator of international exhibitions, together with guest curators. She says:

These masterpieces convey experiences that cannot be put into words. The feeling of connecting with a deeper reality—a power much greater than ourselves—is a mystical experience. These experiences may reach any of us all through the contemplation of nature and the cosmos… These paintings convey the artists’ mystical experiences of something greater than themselves. It is primarily through the contemplation of nature that they have seen with greater clarity.

Dáil_Chamber

Dáil chamber, Parliament, Leinster House, Dublin. Image wikimedia commons

Fiona OLoughlin in Ireland

Fiona OLoughlin has been elected to the Irish Parliament following a general election on Friday 26th February 2016. Fiona is from Rathangan, County Kildare and currently resides at the town of Newbridge.

A former primary schoolteacher, Fiona comes from a local political dynasty – her father, Jimmy served on Kildare County Council for twenty years and her grandfather, Joseph, was a member of the first local council in 1899.

Fiona entered into politics in 1994 when she was elected to Newbridge town-commission. She was elected in 1999  to Kildare County Council. During 2014, she was mayor of Kildare.

One of her particular interests is supporting the ‘Special Olympics’ as well as ‘People in Need’ and she has advocated for people with intellectual disability, within Europe. 

We wish both Clan members well on their disparate but constructive undertakings for the communities of Canada and Ireland.

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More on Easter 1916

Image from graupius

Recalling history from a century ago, Edward writes from Ireland regarding Colm Ó Lochlainn (1892 – 26 June 1972).

A wikipedia.org entry tells us Colm was ” … a printer, typographer, collector of Irish ballads and traditional Irish Uilleann piper. He was notably the author of Irish Street Ballads published in 1939 and More Irish Street Ballads in 1965.”

Edward writes:

This is well in advance of Easter 2016 [the centenary]. Desmond Ryan introduces a series of short accounts of personal recollections of the events of the Easter Rising 1916 – courtesy of RTE (1956).

The text is courtesy of RTE Archives, while the Link below is from the Bureau of Military History, Dublin which provides Colm O Lochlainn’s 1952 witnessed statement. This statement also provides a sample of Colm’s signature at the end.

In this first episode Colm Ó Lochlainn recalls how he and four others were sent to County Kerry to capture and destroy the wireless station at Cahersiveen on Good Friday 1916. The equipment seized was to be used in communications for a planned arms landing.

Colm Ó Lochlainn a captain on the special staff of Joseph Plunkett recalls his memories of the events of Good Friday 1916.

Under orders from the Irish Volunteer leadership in Dublin Colm Ó Lochlainn travelled to Killarney where he was to lead a group who were to remove communications equipment from the wireless station at Cahersiveen before setting fire to the building.

The five men who travelled from Dublin were Con Keating, Cathal Ó Muineacháin (Charlie Monaghan), Donal Sheehan, Denis Daly and Colm Ó Lochlainn. Two cars were waiting in Killarney to take them on to Cahersiveen. Ó Lochlainn and Daly were in the lead car with the other three following in the second vehicle.

On the road to Killorglin the two cars became separated from each other. The mission was aborted after the car with Colm Ó Lochlainn and Daly was stopped at a check point, where they learned that a platoon of soldiers had come to guard the wireless station and that police units were on patrol throughout the area.

Having talked their way through the police check point Ó Lochlainn and Daly had to head across the mountains back towards Killarney. They spent the night in the car before heading back to Dublin by train the following morning.

Screen Shot 2016-02-18 at 8.15.Colm Ó Lochlainn explains that it was some time later before he learned that the second car had driven off the pier at Ballykissane where Keating, Monaghan and Sheehan drowned. The driver of the second car, Thomas McInerney swam to safety.

http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS0751.pdf

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